SharePoint 2013 and Bing Maps Integration

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I was excited to learn that I could use Geolocation and Bing Maps in SharePoint 2013.  So I started down this path,

1. Get Bing Maps Key from here http://www.bingmapsportal.com/. (Note: You don’t need this key, but a bar will display in the middle of your map.)

Bing-Maps-with-Bar

2. Set Bing Maps key at the farm level by running the following PowerShell command:

Set-SPBingMapsKey –BingKey “<Enter a valid Bing Maps key>”

Set-SPBingMapsKey

3. Create a custom list called “Convention Centers”.

4. Add a column called “GPS Location” using the following PowerShell script: (This adds GPS Location to your site columns under Custom Columns.)

Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell -EA 0

$weburl = "http://<my-web-site>"

$fieldXml = "<Field Type ='Geolocation' DisplayName='GPS Location'/>"

$web = Get-SPWeb $weburl

$fieldName = $web.Fields.AddFieldAsXml($fieldXml)

$web.Update()

5. Add GPS Location column to Convention Centers custom list.

6. Find longitude and latitude for convention locations.  There are many out there, but I used this one http://www.findlatitudeandlongitude.com/.

7. Edit each location with longitude and latitude from step 6 above or you can use “Use my location”.

Here I used longitude and latitude for Seattle Conference Center:

Seattle Conference Longitude Latitude

After clicking OK. You’ll get this.

Seattle Conference Longitude Latitude-2

8. Test from the geolocation map icon.

Seattle Conference Longitude Latitude-3

9. Create a Map View.

10. Test map view.

Seattle Conference Longitude Latitude-4

Well, everything seems to work as expected.  So far, so good.

11. Create a page with Web parts.

12. Add Convention Centers list to the Web part. Still working.

13. Check in page. Again, still working.

Seattle Conference Longitude Latitude-5

14. Publish page.  It spins and spins and never renders.

Seattle Conference Longitude Latitude-6

I checked all the logs I could think of, but I couldn’t find anything.  I know I’m missing something here.

Anyway, I have to get this resolved, so I took another route.

15. Back to my page, I added the following code using Script Editor Web Part. I added the following code to get one static location (Columbus Convention Center)to display:

DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
 <html>
 <head>
 <title>Map with initial zoom</title>
 <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
 <script type="text/javascript" src="http://ecn.dev.virtualearth.net/mapcontrol/mapcontrol.ashx?v=7.0"></script>
 <script type="text/javascript">
 var map = null;

function getMap()
 {
 map = new Microsoft.Maps.Map(document.getElementById('myMap'), {credentials: '<Your Bing Map Key>', zoom: 16, center: new Microsoft.Maps.Location(39.9722857, -83.0008507)});
 }

</script>
 </head>
 <body onload="getMap();">
 <div id='myMap' style="position:relative; width:400px; height:400px;"></div>
 </body>
 </html>

16. I published the page and it continues to work.

ColumbusConventionCenterBingMaps

After I find a solution to my issue with Geolocation and Bing Maps, I’ll provide an update.

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Enabling Hyper-V on Windows 8

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In my previous post, I walked through the process of ensuring that your PC can run Hyper-V on Windows 8.  This post is the next step, enabling Hyper-V.

The following assumes that you have already installed Windows 8 Pro or Enterprise on your PC.

Let’s get started.

1. Press Windows + R keys to open the Run box and type appwiz.cpl
appwiz-cpl

or, from Control Panel, select Programs and Features

2. Select Turn Windows features on or off

TurnFeaturesOnorOff

3. Select Hyper-V, and click OK

SelectHyper-V

The Hyper-V binaries is now added to your Windows installation.

Hyper-VApplyingChanges

4. Once Hyper-V feature is enabled, you must reboot your PC to complete the installation.

Restart

After your PC is restarted, Hyper-V Manager is added to your start screen.

Windows8-Start-Screen-Hyper-V

I use Hyper-V Manager often, so I chose to pin it to my taskbar. Here’s my Hyper-V Manager.

Hyper-V-Manager

Next post, I’ll walkthrough setting up networking on your PC (host) and your VMs (guests) with Ethernet and wireless.

Making Sure that Your PC Can Run Hyper-V

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For those who wonder if they could use Hyper-V with Windows 8 by re-purposing their old PCs, here are some helpful hints.

Hardware Requirements:

  • 64-bit system with Second Level Address Translation (SLAT)
  • 4 GB RAM (minimum)

You’ll need either Windows 8 Pro or Windows 8 Enterprise

To check and see if your PC supports SLAT

1. Download Coreinfo

2. Extract coreinfo.zip to your location choice

3. Open Command Prompt window and Run as administrator

cmd-administrator

4. Navigate to the coreinfo extracted location, and type coreinfo.exe –v

Since I already have Hyper-V enabled, the results produced as captured in the screenshot below

coreinfo-v
On PCs with Intel processors, without Hyper-V already enabled, the EPT line would have an * indicator.
“*” means the feature is present
“-“ means it is missing

In my next post, I will walkthrough how to enable Hyper-V on Windows 8.